We grow two kinds of Comfrey – Common (officinale) and Russian (uplandicum) – both are used medicinally.  Russian Comfrey is reported to have more allantoin, the constituent that makes Comfrey able to heal skin so well.

Several sources state that Russian Comfrey has purple flowers, but these have white flowers.  The leaves are slightly thinner and more pointed than Common Comfrey leaves.  NOTE  – these plants were purchased from Richters and we’re relatively sure they correctly labeled the plants, but we’ve learned that not every label is correct.  (We recently discovered that a Lilac we’ve had for years had been labeled “Japanese” and is really “Korean.”)

Russian Comfrey

Russian Comfrey

Our Common Comfrey was purchased about 15 years ago.  We divided that original plant over the years to make two 30′ long rows (about 40 plants.)  They grow along a path on a hill under the shade of a Cottonwood tree and a  Mulberry tree.

Common Comfrey

Common Comfrey

Comfrey is from the Boraginaceae family.  The leaves are very similar to the rough leaves of Borage.  Both will cause a skin irritation from their prickliness.

Advertisements