Red Clover and White Sage

Red Clover and White Sage

Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) grows wild on the roadsides around here.   Because the plants near any road could be contaminated with sprays or exhaust fumes, we harvested the blossoms for many years from a neighbors two-mile driveway.  They were gracious enough to not mow until after we harvested.

A few years ago we decided to grow them here.  We planted seed and they did very well.  This year we’re rearranging a bit and decided to transplant a few Red Clover to see how they do in a new area.  They have incredibly long roots, once mature, and may not survive transplanting, but we tried.  We have some seed as back up!

Red Clover root

Red Clover root

 

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At least one is doing well the day after transplanting.

 

Harvested Red Clover blossoms

Harvested Red Clover blossoms (2012)

Red Clover is considered a spring tonic and is also an antioxidant.   Fresh flowers are used to treat insect bites and stings.  A compress of flowers can be used to reduce the pain of arthritic joints.  Internally they are used to treat chronic skin problems by cleansing the body of toxins.  They are also used in treating menopause systems because they contain estrogen-like properties.

 

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